Buried Child

Buried Child by Sam Shepard (1979)

buried child

Theatre | Drama1 StarBlurb:

“A newly revised edition of an American classic, Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer Prize winning Buried Child is as fierce and unforgettable as it was when it was first produced more than twenty-five years ago.

A scene of madness greets Vince and his girlfriend as they arrive at the squalid farmhouse of Vince’s hard-drinking grandparents, who seem to have no idea who he is Continue reading

Boys’ Life

Boys’ Life by Howard Korder (1988)

boys life

Theatre | Drama1 StarBlurb:

“Two gripping plays by one of America’s most exciting playwrights Boy’s Life: love, relationships, and growing up in New York City “a substantial play. It makes Howard Korder a presence to take seriously in the theater” (Village Voice); Search and Destroy: corporate politics, lies and relationships Continue reading

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee (1962)

who's afraid

Theatre | Comedic Drama5-starsBlurb:

“Twelve times a week,” answered Uta Hagen when asked how often she’d like to play Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? In the same way, audiences and critics alike could not get enough of Edward Albee’s masterful play. A dark comedy, it portrays husband and wife George and Martha in a searing night of dangerous fun and games. Continue reading

Uncommon Women and Others

Uncommon Women and Others by Wendy Wasserstein (1978)

uncommon women

Theatre | Drama4 StarsBlurb:

“Comprised of a collage of interrelated scenes, the action begins with a reunion, six years after graduation, of five close friends and classmates at Mount Holyoke College. They compare notes on their activities since leaving school and then, in a series of flashbacks, we see them in their college days and learn of the Continue reading

A Taste of Honey

A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney (1956)

a taste of honey

Theatre | Drama3 StarsBlurb:

“A sensational theatrical success in London, A Taste of Honey was written by Shelagh Delaney at the age of 18. The play prompted Graham Greene to say that it had “all the freshness of Mr. Osborne’s Look Back In Anger and a greater maturity.” A Taste of Honey won Miss Delaney two national awards, the sale of film rights productions at Stratford, London, and Paris, and a round of applause from the critics.  Continue reading