Her & Him

Her by Pierre Alex Jeanty (2017)
Him by Pierre Alex Jeanty (2018)

herhim

Poetry | Contemporary
4.5 starsBlurb:

HER.
“Her” is a collection of poetry and prose about women, their strengths and beauty. Every woman should know the feelings of being loved and radiating those feelings back to her mate. This is a beautiful expression of heartfelt emotion using short, gratifying sentiments. If there is a lover in you, you will not get enough of “Her.” Continue reading

Fierce Fairytales

Fierce Fairytales: poems and stories to stir your soul by Nikita Gill (2018)

fierce fairytales

Poetry | Fantasy
3.5 StarsBlurb:

“Traditional fairytales are rife with cliches and gender stereotypes: beautiful, silent princesses; ugly, jealous, and bitter villainesses; girls who need rescuing; and men who take all the glory.

But in this rousing new prose and poetry collection, Nikita Gill gives Once Upon a Time a much-needed modern makeover. Continue reading

Love Her Wild

Love Her Wild by Atticus (2017)

love her wild

Poetry | Contemporary
5 starsBlurb:

Love Her Wild is a collection of new and beloved poems from Atticus, the young writer who has captured the hearts and minds of hundreds of thousands of avid followers on his Instagram account. In Love Her Wild, Atticus captures what is both raw and relatable about the smallest and the grandest moments in life: the first glimpse of a new love in Paris; skinny dipping on a summer’s night; the irrepressible exuberance of the female spirit; or drinking whiskey in the desert watching the rising sun. With honesty, poignancy, and romantic flair, Atticus distills the most exhilarating highs and the heartbreaking lows of life and love into a few perfectly evocative lines, ensuring that his words will become etched in your mind—and will awaken your sense of adventure.”
Goodreads 

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Plato Poetica

Plato Poetica by Daniel Klawitter (2017)
-Review Request-

plato poetica

Fiction | Poetry
4 Stars
Blurb:

“In playful and frequently rhymed verse, Daniel Klawitter’s Plato Poetica addresses, or, rather, chuckles at, the Platonic notion that “there is an old quarrel between philosophy and poetry.” Beginning each poem in the collection with an epigraph from Plato himself, Klawitter proceeds with the waggish good nature of a folkloric trickster to stretch and snap, dismantle and reconstruct, frolic with and delight in Plato’s words and ideas–reminding us that a valuable component of wisdom is perhaps the ability to not take anything, including philosophy itself, too seriously.”
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BRN #14: Poetic Ponderings

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So I’m not generally a big poetry fanatic but every once in a while I stumble across a poem or hear someone perform a piece of spoken word and it strikes something in me. So today I don’t have a book review prepared for you but as it is National Poetry Month I thought I’d share a few poems that I love instead. Maybe you’ll like them or maybe you’re not big on poetry either. Either way I felt like sharing these. Maybe it’s my trip to the ocean that’s putting me in a poetic mood?
For this post I made sure to include a few poems about books since books are what we all love.

When Death Comes | Allowables | King Henry VIGood Books | Macbeth | Notes on the Art of Poetry | Old Books | The Gold Bell in Charn | The Arrow and The Song | Hades and Persephone | The Author to Her Book

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Disinheritance

Disinheritance by John Sibley Williams (2016)
-Review Request-

Disinheritance

Fiction | Poetry
4 Stars
Blurb:

“A lyrical, philosophical, and tender exploration of the various voices of grief, including those of the broken, the healing, the son-become-father, and the dead, Disinheritance acknowledges loss while celebrating the uncertainty of a world in constant revision. From the concrete consequences of each human gesture to soulful interrogations into “this amalgam of real / and fabled light,” these poems inhabit an unsteady betweenness, where ghosts can be more real than the flesh and blood of one’s own hands.”
Goodreads 
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